IAF Young Space Leaders 2017

The annual Young Space Leaders (YSL) Recognition Programme recognises exceptional students and young professionals (age 21-35) who demonstrate leadership in their academic or early careers by contributing  to astronautics through their academic and/or professional activities, reaching out to other young people and to their community to share knowledge and experience, engaging colleagues in the international space community, and contributing to the work of IAF committees and/or volunteering in support of other Federation activities.

The IAF is proud to present the 2017 Young Space Leaders!

Those 5 students and young professionals were chosen by the Young Space Leaders Recognition Selection Committee composed of six higly experienced space stakeholders. They will attend the IAC Gala Dinner as guests of the IAF President and the IAC registration fees will be waived for the year of their induction.

Minoo Rathnasabapathy

Minoo Rathnasabapathy currently serves as the Executive Director of the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC), a global non-governmental organization which acts in support of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications, based in Vienna, Austria. Ms. Rathnasabapathy is responsible for leading the operations, business development, strategy, and policy output for SGAC, a network that represents over 10,000 university students and young professionals in 110+ countries.

Before joining SGAC, Ms. Rathnasabapathy worked as an Aerospace Engineer on the structural design optimization for the ARIANE 5 launch system in Augsburg, Germany. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, and is currently completing her PhD in Aerospace Engineering. Her doctoral thesis investigates the impact dynamics of novel materials used in aerospace structures.

Ms. Rathnasabapathy serves as a member of the World Economic Forum Global Future Council on Space Technology and the Generation-Next Advisory Board for Via Satellite. Besides her interest in the space sector, Minoo enjoys hiking, bungee-jumping, and has a black belt in Shotokan Karate.

 

Patrick Hambloch

Patrick Hambloch is an aerospace systems engineer with more than a decade of experience in multi-disciplinary engineering and research. In multiple capacities he has led diverse teams of space professionals, scientists, and engineers from several countries.

He is currently working as research engineer at the Rotorcraft Systems Engineering and Simulation Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In that position he supports experiments on the International Space Station, in the field of Airborne Science, and other engineering projects.

Between 2009 and 2015 Patrick worked at the Microgravity User Support Center (MUSC) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany. At the MUSC he led a team of engineering and science professionals for the operations of the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL), a science payload onboard the International Space Station. During his time at DLR, the enthusiastic MSL team successfully processed 30 science experiments on orbit. Patrick closely coordinated with different teams around the globe at the European Space Agency, Airbus Defense and Space, NASA, and science investigators in Europe and the United States. Between 2006 and 2007 he was responsible for the design and manufacturing of the electrical harness of the second Young Engineers’ Satellite (YES2), which was launched in September 2007 from Baikonur Cosmodrome as part of the Foton-M3 mission.

In the IAF, Patrick currently serves as the Vice Chair of the Workforce Development and Young Professional Program Committee and is also a member of the Knowledge Management Technical Committee. He is also Director of Academic Outreach of the North Alabama chapter of the Project Management Institute.

Patrick Hambloch holds a Master’s degree in Space Systems Engineering from TU Delft (Delft, the Netherlands) and a Diplom in Electrical Engineering from Hochschule Niederrhein (Krefeld, Germany). He is also certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute.

 

Stephanie Wan

Stephanie Wan is a Systems Analyst at Overlook Systems Technologies Inc., providing support to NASA’s Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Office in Washington, DC. Her leadership experiences through the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) over the past 9 years and passion to connect her global network with creative opportunities led to secondments with the U.S. Department of State (Space and Advanced Technology Office) and the Department of Commerce (National Coordination Office on GPS). She graduated from American University with a Bachelors degree in International Studies, and a Masters degree in International Science and Technology Policy, with a focus in Space Policy from The George Washington University – Space Policy Institute. Her international background and travel interests have led her to live/study abroad in Belgium, China, Japan, and South Korea, as well as learn to speak more than five different languages. Over the course of her career and studies, Stephanie has focused on outreach & strategic communications/engagement, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), small satellites, international & inter-agency cooperation, space communications, and emerging space nations.

2008 was her first experience attending the Space Generation Congress (SGC) and IAC in Glasgow, where she first experienced the IAF Young Professionals Programme (YPP) Committee. She is currently involved with the IAF SCaN, Space Education and Outreach, as well as the YPP Committees. Inspired by the IAF YPP’s commitment to the next generation, she has been utilizing her IAC experiences to initiate succession planning strategies, student and young professional programs, and fundraise scholarship opportunities within various space organizations.

Besides her current work with the U.S. government, Stephanie has worked with a variety of organizations including: SpaceWorks Commercial, National Council for International Visitors, the Federal Communications Commission, and SRI International. She is currently on the Board of Advisors for Blue Marble Space, and served as SGAC Chair from 2015-2017.

 

Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty

Dr Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), Waterloo, Canada, looking at the intersection of policy and technology tools in support of the implementation of international law. She is currently focused on the potential of blockchain technology to address reporting under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the evolution of satellite systems to support national greenhouse gas emissions inventory’s.

Timiebi is Associate Chair, Space Policy, Economics and Law at International Space University Space Studies Program and has guest lectured at the Faculty of Law, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada and the African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in Nigeria. Timiebi was previously the Executive Director of the World Space Week Association, coordinating the global response to the UN-declared World Space Week. In 2016, there were over 2700 World Space Week events registered in 86 countries. In this this role, she became a member of the Student Education and Outreach Committee of the International Astronautic Federation (IAF). Since 2008, she has presented papers at 4 IAF International Astronautic Congress (IAC) sessions on a variety of issues, primarily on the African Space Policy and other legal and policy issues affecting emerging and aspirant space nations. She will be presenting at the 2017 IAC on “Looking at a global plan to monitor emissions using satellite technology: institutions and cooperation mechanisms.” She has also acted as rapporteur at IAC for the Sessions of the International Institute of Space Law.

Formerly a lawyer at the Nigerian Space Agency, Timiebi was a member of the Nigerian delegation to the Legal Subcommittee of the United Nations COPUOS in 2011, and was nominated by the United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs to represent Africa in its 50th year celebration of women in space, based in part on initiatives she supported in Africa including the establishment of the African Regional Rounds of the IISL Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Competition and the NASA Space Apps challenge in Nigeria. Timiebi also represented Nigeria as the Next Generation Aviation Professional at the International Civil Aviation Organization in celebration of 70 years of the Chicago Convention. From 2012-2016, Timiebi was a Consultant at Euroconsult, a leading global space consulting firm, where she led the socio-aspects of Impact Assessment studies of the Canadian Space Sector, Led a pipeline of commercialization studies on technology transfer for the Canadian Space Agency, and contributed to reports on Emerging space nations, Earth Observations, and Government Space Markets.

Previously the Director’s Assistant at the International Institute of Space Commerce, Timiebi is a member of the technical advisory team on the board of the New York Center for Space Entrepreneurship and was. As well as PhD, She has an LLM Law (McGill, Canada) MSc in Space Management (ISU, France), BL Nigerian Law School, LLB Law (UK).
A recipient of several academic and professional awards, in celebration of International Women`s Day 2016, Timiebi was recognized by a Canadian cultural organization as one of 16 women for “significant contribution to Quebec society” including for her work on the board of the Amal Women’s Centre, a Montreal based non for profit supporting women suffering from domestic violence abuse.

Timiebi would like to thank the World Space Week Association and the IAF for nominating and awarding her with this prestigious honor, and for the support she has received from mentors. She hopes to encourage all young people that it is not where you start that matters but where you are going and who you help lift up along the way.

 

Laszlo Bacsardi

Laszlo Bacsardi obtained M.Sc. degree in computer engineering at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Budapest, Hungary in 2006. He wrote his PhD thesis on the possible connection between space communications and quantum communications at the BME Department of Telecommunications in 2012. His current research interests are in mobile ad hoc communication, quantum computing and quantum communications.

From 2009, he works at the University of Sopron, Hungary (formerly known as University of West Hungary). Currently, he is Associate Professor and the Head of the Institute of Informatics and Economics. As an Adjunct Assistant Professor, he is member of faculty at the Department of Networked Systems and Services, BME as well.

Dr. Bacsardi is the Secretary General of the Hungarian Astronautical Society (MANT), which is the oldest Hungarian non-profit space association founded in 1956. He is member of the board of a Hungarian scientific newspaper (‘World of Nature’​) and he is the publisher of a non-profit Hungarian space news portal (‘Space World’​). Furthermore, he is member of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the Scientific Association for Infocommunications Hungary (HTE—an IEEE and IEEE ComSoc sister society). He has joined the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) and served as the Hungarian National Point of Contact between 2012-2016. As a member of SGAC’s Executive Office, he is currently active as Regional Events Coordinator.

He is member of two committees of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF): IAF Space Communications and Navigation Committee and the IAF Space Societies Committee. Moreover, Dr. Bacsardi is substitute management committee member of the COST Action CA15220 Quantum Technologies in Space which is a four-year-long European research action started in 2016. He has more than 80 publications.

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