Greenhouse Gas Measurements from Space – Difficult Challenges, Emerging Success, and Plans for the Future

Thursday 4 October 2018, 08:30 – 09:30
Location: Bremen Conference Center – DLR Hall

Atmospheric carbon is steadily increasing. The Keeling Curve, depicting the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere over Hawaii, started in 1958 and initially measured 315 ppm. In April 2014, the concentration topped 401 ppm. Contributions to this increase are coming from anthropomorphic and natural sources. As the concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) grow, Earth is warming and changing the future environment with major challenges to the life on the planet. The COP 21 Declaration is an international recognition of this increase and consequences on life across the planet. Creating a well calibrated, accurate, and globally accepted time series of GHG levels and sustaining those over decades represents a major commitment of space agencies. Leaders from involved agencies will articulate the difficult challenges of making the needed measurements, convey emerging successes from efforts already underway, and describe plans for the future of these critical observations.

Moderator

Harry CIKANEK

Director, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

United States of America

Speakers

Josef ASCHBACHER

Director of Earth Observation Programmes and Head of ESRIN, European Space Agency (ESA)

Italy

Juliette LAMBIN

Earth Observation Program Manager, Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES)

France

Michael H. FREILICH

Retired – Former Director of the Earth Science Division, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

United States of America

Alain RATIER

Director General, Eumetsat

France

Naoto MATSUURA

Senior Chief Officer of Satellite Applications and Director of Earth Observation Research Center (EORC), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Japan

Team Germany

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