Keynotes

We are  delighted to have sixteen inspiring Symposium Keynotes, over the five days of the congress, from outstanding experts. These high-profile symposia present the key leaders and top trends impacting the space community.

 

Monday 1 October

B1.1 2018 Activities of the International Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

Astrid-Christina Koch

Government Official – European Earth Observation Program – Copernicus,
European Commission,
Belgium

Symposium: B1. IAF EARTH OBSERVATION

Session:  1 – International Cooperation in Earth Observation Missions

Room: ZARM 3

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: 2018 Activities of the International Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

ABSTRACT

As the 2018 CEOS Chair, the European Commission will provide an overview of the ongoing activities representing the entire CEOS organization. Its aim is to deepen awareness of and support for its Earth observation missions, data, and activities, their global relevance and benefits.

In 2018 CEOS has started the process for launching a global greenhouse gas monitoring capacity using an ensemble of independent, observation-based atmospheric data. This capacity is needed to complement the bottom up efforts to support the implementation of the Paris Agreement for mitigation and adaptation.

CEOS is undertaking dedicated preparatory work in a coordinated international context, to provide cumulative added value to the specific programmatic activities of their member agencies. Concerted efforts have already begun in the context of 2018 during the European Commission’s Chairmanship of CEOS.

They include: The finalisation of the definition of an architecture of space component elements to address the requirements of a GHG monitoring system, the documentation of best practices on the relationships between individual Space Agencies and their counterparts working on the modelling aspects, the inventories and in situ data provision, as well as, the further consolidation of partnerships and collaborations between the relevant international entities.

BIOGRAPHY

Astrid is working as the International cooperation officer for the Copernicus programme in the European Commission in Brussels. She is participating in this session in her role as European Commission coordinator of the CEOS Chair team 2018. She represents the Copernicus programme at multilateral fora (e.g. GEO. CEOS) and is working with international partners worldwide. In 2018 Copernicus cooperation arrangements were signed with India, Chile, Brazil, Colombia, Ukraine and Serbia.Before accepting the current position she worked as a Science Diplomat at the EU Delegation to the United States  and as a science offcier for the European Reseach and Innovation Programme in the European Commission. Before joining the European Commission she was employed at the German Ministry of Finance to supervise the five Customs Laboratories.She holds a Ph.D. in Natural Sciences from Kiel University/Germany and worked as a  Post-doc at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

C3.1 Fifty Years of Space Solar

John C. Mankins

President,
ARTEMIS Innovation Management Solutions, LLC,
United States

Symposium: C3. IAF SPACE POWER

Session: 1 – Solar Power Satellite

Room: CCB Bergen

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: Fifty Years of Space Solar

ABSTRACT

Increased availability of affordable energy has never been more important to economic growth. Space Solar Power (SSP) – delivering energy for Earth from space – is one of the fundamental options for meeting this economic challenge. Every few years the international space solar power (SSP) community has organized a symposium on the topic, including SPS 2004 in Spain; SPS 2009 in Canada, SPS 2014 in Japan, and at the end of May 2018, SPS 2018 in the USA. 2018 is the 50th Anniversary of Dr. Peter Glaser’s invention of, and first paper on the topic of the solar power satellite (SPS). This paper presents a retrospective of the past fifty years, and a prospective view of the next fifty years of SSP.

BIOGRAPHY

John C. Mankins is President of Artemis Innovation Management Solutions LLC and of Mankins Space Technology, Inc., Vice President of the Moon Village Association, and serves on the National Space Society and SPACE Canada Boards. During his career at NASA HQ and JPL he held numerous positions, including Chief Technologist for Human Exploration and Development of Space, where he received the NASA Exceptional Technology Achievement Medal. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in Physics, and an MBA. Mankins is known for the first detailed definitions of the TRLs, and as leading expert in the field of “Space Solar Power”.

C4.1 The European Way for Liquid Propulsion – Hydrogen / Methane Family Concept

Gerald Hagemann

Head of Engineering Liquid Propulsion,
ArianeGroup,
Germany

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION

Session: 1 – Propulsion System (1)

Room: ZARM 5

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: The European Way for Liquid Propulsion – Hydrogen / Methane Family Concept

ABSTRACT

European Competence in Liquid Propulsion builds upon Hydrogen propellant, since approx. 40 years with the Ariane launcher family.

Ariane 6 builds upon this heritage

With this core competence, the Hydrogen knowledge can be easily expanded towards Methane. Prometheus is a prominent engine demonstrator programme that builds upon this.

ArianeGroup expands this commonality further towards an engine family in the 1 – 10 – 100 tons thrust classes, by strictly focusing on “design to manufacturing” or “design to produce”. Following this, same design and manufacturing processes are considered as standard for all engine thrust classes. As result, “economy of scales” effect on recurring costs can be realized without strictly following “the one single” engine concept.

DLR & ArianeGroup have demonstrated through LOX / Methane tests at 40 tons thrust level the scaling from Hydrogen to Methane. Elements on this will be shortly presented as well as the 100 tons Prometheus test bench.

BIOGRAPHY

Gerald Hagemann started his professional career 1991 with DLR Lampoldshausen, German Aerospace Center, as Ph.D. student and later on as research scientist and team leader in the field of liquid rocket propulsion.

From March 2015 to July 2016 he was leading the Business Unit “Propulsion” in Airbus Defence & Space. In parallel, he actively participated to the creation of Airbus Safran Launchers, now ArianeGroup, namely with the organization set-up and the later the transfer of the Business Unit “Propulsion” into the joint venture.

Within ArianeGroup, he holds the position as “Head of Liquid Propulsion Engineering”, leading this Engineering Center with 380 engineers in France and Germany. Gerald Hagemann holds a Ph.D. from University of Stuttgart in the field of rocket propulsion.

E1.6 Using Design Competition Projects for a Spacecraft Design Capstone

David B. Spencer

Professor, Recipient of the Malina Medal 2018,
The Pennsylvania State University,
United States

Symposium: E1. IAF SPACE EDUCATION AND OUTREACH SYMPOSIUM

Session:  6 – Calling Planet Earth – Space Outreach to the General Public

Room: CCB Scharoun

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: Using Design Competition Projects for a Spacecraft Design Capstone

ABSTRACT

In the search for realistic design projects for a spacecraft design capstone course, an excellent source of project ideas comes from various design competitions.  At Penn State University, we have used this source of design projects successfully for nearly two decades in our senior Spacecraft Design courses.  In recent years, we have used three sources of these projects: The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Space Design and Space Transportation competitions, the NASA-sponsored RASC-AL (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage) projects and the Mars Society’s design competitions provide detailed ideas for realistic projects.  Because of the well-conceived projects, the students appreciate the realism of the projects, which inspires them to perform at a high level.  Additionally, many students use this as an entry point into the world of systems engineering, whether it is designing space missions to Pluto or designing a drone aircraft to deliver packages.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. David Spencer is a Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University.  His research areas include: spacecraft dynamics and controls, trajectory optimization, space systems engineering, and theoretical and applied astrodynamics.

 

He is a Fellow of the American Astronautical Society, an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, and a Corresponding Member of the IAA.

 

Dr. Spencer received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kentucky, an M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University, an M.B.A. from Penn State, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Tuesday 2 October

A2.2 Fluid Science Experiments Conducted on the ISS

Valentina Shevtsova

Head of the Research Group,
Université Libre de Bruxelles,
Belgium

Symposium:  A2. IAF MICROGRAVITY SCIENCES AND PROCESSES

Session: 2 – Fluid and Materials Sciences

Room: Bremen 2

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Fluid Science Experiments Conducted on the ISS

ABSTRACT

In a liquid mixture composed of several components, a temperature gradient leads to the heat and mass transport, i.e., thermodiffusion or Soret effect. With the aim to establish reliable and guaranteed convection-free reference data on thermodiffusion, ESA has created instrument SODI (selectable optical diagnostics instrument) which is placed on the ISS. While examining a binary solution, the IVIDIL, the first experiment inside the SODI, confirmed that (a) the daily onboard environment of the ISS does not perturb diffusion-controlled experiments and (b) the results obtained onboard the ISS are reliable. Currently, DCMIX (Diffusion Coefficients in MIXtures) project is focused on the investigation of the ternary mixtures. Another topic of the research on the ISS is related to Marangoni convection. The space experiment JEREMI (Japanese European Space Research Experiment on Marangoni Instabilities) is aimed to the study of the threshold of hydrothermal instabilities in two-phase systems in cylindrical geometry.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Valentina Shevtsova is a head of the research group at Microgravity Research Centre of Free Brussels University (ULB), Belgium. Her research interests cover a large number of topics including multiphase flow and transport with diffusion and Soret effect, the physics and mechanics of fluid interfaces, vibrational phenomena in fluids. Her work has produced over 170 refereed papers and she is a regular speaker at international meetings. She was/is involved as the principal investigator in 5 space experiments on the International Space Station and she conducted 6 parabolic flight campaigns. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Microgravity Science and Technology journal.

C3.2 Peter Glaser Lecture – about Prof. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam

Guy Pignolet

Chairman,
Science Sainte Rose,
La Reunion

Symposium: C3. IAF SPACE POWER

Session: 2 – Wireless Power Transmission Technologies and Application

Room: CCB Bergen

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Peter Glaser Lecture – about Prof. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam

ABSTRACT

Prof. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, born in India in a Tamil family, opened his mind to an extended world while in high school when he discovered that a hard solid table was also a void filled with sparse atoms and electrons spinning at equivalent speeds of thousands of kilometers per second. As an engineer, during the 60’s and 70’s he was a leading figure in India’s access to Space. Later he developed a missile capability for the defense of India, and eventually, from 2002 till 2007 he was the President of the Republic of India. An outspoken proponent of Space Solar Systems, Abdul Kalam received the Vernher von Braun Prize in 2013, and he proposed nations to unite for the building of Space Power. He concluded by saying we had the capability to make the world livable for all, peaceful and prosperous and asked “What are we waiting for ?”.

BIOGRAPHY

Guy Pignolet is a senior space educator currently working for the development of space activities in his home region, the French/European island of La Reunion. After a carrier in oil field geophysical exploration, he entered space activities at the age of 36 with the French Agency Cnes where he was in charge of developing a future studies department. Guy Pignolet has been actively involved with the International Astronautical Federation where he chaired the Educational Committee during the 90’s before joining the Space Power Committee. Recently he made a French translation of Prof. Abdul Kalam’s famous autobiography “Wings of Fire”.

C4.2 Recent Developments in Solid Propulsion

Jean-Francois Guery

Solid Propulsion Engineering,
ArianeGroup,
France

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION

Session: 2 – Propulsion System (2)

Room: ZARM 5

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Recent Developments in Solid Propulsion

ABSTRACT

Ten years after the international paper “Solid propulsion for space applications: An updated roadmap” written by contributions from Europe, USA and Japan, presented during IAC 2007 in Hyderabad,  and published in Acta Astronautica, this keynote will focus on the recent developments in solid propulsion, the evolution of the market of space launchers, and the associated new challenges.

BIOGRAPHY

Jean-Francois Guery has spent 28 years in solid propulsion, from research studies on solid propellants and solid rocket motors design, addressing in the 90’s topics like combustion instabilities and thrust oscillations, up to design model now used on Ariane 6 (AIAA 2008 SRTC Best Paper Award). He was Program Director, then CTO of Europropulsion from 2013 to 2018, managing the production of Ariane 5 and Vega P80 solid rocket motors, and the development of the P120C for Ariane 6 and Vega C. He is now vice-director of Solid Propulsion Engineering in ArianeGroup. Jean-Francois Guery is also an AIAA Associate Fellow.

C4.9 Advance of Scramjet Operating Mode Comprehension based on Shock Tunnel Experiments and Numerical Modelling

Klaus Hannemann

Head of Spacecraft Department,
DLR Göttingen,
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Germany

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION

Session: 9 – Hypersonic Air-breathing and Combined Cycle Propulsion

Room: ZARM 5

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: Advance of Scramjet Operating Mode Comprehension based on Shock Tunnel Experiments and Numerical Modelling

ABSTRACT

At DLR, hydrogen fueled integrated scramjet configurations were in the focus of combined experimental and numerical research activities. The ground based testing was conducted in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen. Among the considered configurations is the Australian HyShot II flight test vehicle. It was considered to be well suited for basic combustor investigations and numerical tool validation purposes. Benchmark data was compiled related to combustor flows. The latter focused on the response of the HyShot II combustor to equivalence ratios close to the critical value at which the onset of thermal choking occurs. The detailed analysis of the developing shock train and its unexpected behaviour revealed new insight in the combustor flow generated by localized thermal choking. A small scale flight experiment was designed in the framework of the LAPCAT II project. The complete scramjet flow path was subsequently tested and the numerically predicted positive aero-propulsive balance could be demonstrated by utilizing the free flight force measurement technique based on optical tracking.

BIOGRAPHY

K. Hannemann studied mechanical engineering at the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. He received his diploma in 1984 and his doctoral degree in 1987. Since 1988 he works on experimental and numerical aerothermodynamics for space vehicles and space propulsion at the German Aerospace Center in Göttingen. In 2002 he became Head of the Spacecraft Department. Since 2010 he lectures at the Justus Liebig Universität Gießen and in 2013 he was appointed Professor for Spacecraft. K. Hannemann is member of a number of international committees, serves on the Editorial Board of the Shock Wave Journal and is Field Editor Aerothermodynamics for the CEAS Space Journal.

D2.7 Experience from Suborbital Reusable Launches

Ariane Cornell

Head of Marketing Astronaut flight and New Glenn Commercial Sales Director,
Blue Origin,
United States

Symposium: D2. IAF SPACE TRANSPORTATION SOLUTIONS AND INNOVATIONS

Session: 7 – Small Launchers: Concepts and Operations (Part I)

Room: CCB Lloydsaal

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: Experience from Suborbital Reusable Launches

ABSTRACT

Blue Origin has unique experiance in developing , launching and refurbishing a fist stage / suborbital vehicle. The stunning success of the New shepard and the applicability to not only large launchers but also micro launchers.

BIOGRAPHY

At Blue Origin, Ariane Cornell is the Director for New Glenn Commercial Sales – Americas. She also is the Head of Astronaut Strategy & Sales.

Ariane was formerly based in Vienna, Austria as the Executive Director of the Space Generation Advisory Council in Support of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications (SGAC).  She headed SGAC’s delegations to international conferences and the United Nations, as well as ran the organization’s operations, business development, strategy, and policy output.

Ariane supports the international aerospace community in other capacities and organizations.  She currently is on the board of the Society of Satellite Professionals International (SSPI) and has served on the board of Women in Aerospace – Europe.

Previously, Ariane worked in international management consulting, first with Accenture based in San Francisco as an analyst and then with Booz Allen Hamilton in Washington, DC as a senior consultant.

Ariane earned an MBA from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from Stanford University.

E7.1 Space Law and International Organisations

Marco Ferrazzani

Head of Legal Services Department,
European Space Agency (ESA),
France

Symposium: E7. 61st IISL COLLOQUIUM ON THE LAW OF OUTER SPACE

Session: 1 – 10th Nandasiri Jasentuliyana Keynote Lecture on Space Law and Young Scholars Session

Room: Bremen 3

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: Space Law and International Organisations

ABSTRACT

In the first part of this session, Marco Ferrazzani will deliver the keynote lecture “Space law and international organisations”. The second part of this session will be dedicated to the space lawyers of the future and young scholars (under 35 years old) who are invited to present a paper on a relevant topic of space law.

BIOGRAPHY

Marco Ferrazzani is the Legal Counsel and Head of the Legal Services department at the European Space Agency, based at its headquarters in Paris, France. In this position, he provides a full spectrum of legal advice and guidance on the legal and programmatic aspects of ESA’s programmes and policies.

As ESA’s Legal Counsel, Dr. Ferrazzani is advisor to the ESA Director General and to the ESA Council for all institutional and legal matters, including the interpretation of the ESA Convention and all relevant legal instruments. In addition to managing a team of international legal officers in his role as Head of the Legal Services department at ESA, he advises ESA’s organs and its Member States on a wide variety of legal matters.

Wednesday 3 October

B4.5 Rocket Lab: Liberating the Small Satellite Market

Bradley Schneider

EVP/CFO/General Manager,
Rocket Lab,
United States

Symposium: B4. 25th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

Session: 5 – Access to Space for Small Satellite Missions

Room: ZARM 2

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: Rocket Lab: Liberating the Small Satellite Market

ABSTRACT

With the successful launch of the Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle and the completion of the “Still Testing” mission, which carried three customer spacecraft to their desired orbits in January 2018, Rocket Lab is well-positioned to begin delivering on the goal of providing unprecedented access to space for small satellite payloads. Upon entering full commercial operations, Rocket Lab seeks to address major barriers currently associated with small satellites, including long lead times to launch, reaching preferred orbits, and cost. The Electron launch vehicle is a dedicated small launcher designed to liberate the small satellite market with dedicated, high-frequency launch opportunities. Electron is a two-stage vehicle capable of delivering payloads of 150 kg to a 500 km sun-synchronous orbit, the target range for the small satellite market. Vertical integration combined with streamlined processes reduce the traditional lead time to put a satellite on orbit from years to months or even weeks. With the world’s first fully commercial launch range in Mahia, New Zealand, Rocket Lab can accommodate an increased launch cadence as well as reach orbital inclinations from sun-synchronous through to 39 degrees from a single site. Rocket Lab’s Electron vehicle is ready to open space up to the burgeoning small satellite market.

BIOGRAPHY

Mr. Bradley Schneider is the Executive Vice President/General Manager of USA Operations for Rocket Lab USA, Inc., a premier institute for innovative space systems with operations in the United States and New Zealand. In this role, he is responsible for day-to-day operations and development of all U.S. activities including the U.S. manufacturing and production of the Electron Launch Vehicle. Mr. Schneider has over 30 years of experience in the aerospace and defense industry, focusing the last decade and a half on the development of small satellite and small launch vehicle technologies.

Mr. Schneider has performed senior leadership roles as Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer and General Manager for very successful start-up/private Company’s and extensive public sector experience with Lockheed Martin Corporation and Raytheon. As a senior executive of innovative high technology Aerospace and Defense Company’s dedicated to the design, development and manufacturing of state-of-the-art systems, Mr. Schneider has been committed to reducing the cost of access to space. In addition, Mr. Schneider held key roles within Small ICBM, Peacekeeper, Cassini, Pathfinder, Stardust, Genesis, Mars Surveyor, TacSat-2 and others totaling 15 major space flight programs. Mr. Schneider received a B.S. degree in Finance and Accounting from Brigham Young University. He has been recognized by NASA, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Wharton Business School and Inc. 500 for outstanding leadership and achievement.

C1.5 How to Sense Gravity?

Eberhard Gill

Professor, Chair of Space Systems Engineering ,
Delft University of Technology,
The Netherlands

Symposium: C1. IAF ASTRODYNAMICS

Session: 5 – Guidance, Navigation & Control (1)

Room: CCB Borgward

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: How to Sense Gravity?

ABSTRACT

What has Newton’s apple to do with a hydrogen atom falling into a black hole? What does a rotating massive body do to the space-time surrounding it? How can you really measure the tiny distortions of space-time and separate them from fictitious effects arising from rigorous application of fundamental theory? What are present-days satellite missions contributing to characterize the Earth’s gravity field and which future challenges and developments does satellite technology hold to sense gravity?

The Breakwell lecture will try to answer these questions based on the author’s fascination and examination with the phenomenon of gravity and the ways how to sense, measure and characterize it.

BIOGRAPHY

Prof. Eberhard Gill obtained his PhD in theoretical astrophysics from the Eberhard-Karls-University in Germany. He was a researcher at the DLR from 1989 to 2006 in the field of precise orbit determination, autonomous navigation and formation flying. Dr. Gill was Co-Investigator and Principal Investigator on several international missions, including Rosetta. Since 2007, he holds the Chair of Space Systems Engineering at the Technical University of Delft. Dr. Gill has authored or co-authored more than 250 journal articles and conference papers and four text books. He holds three patents on GNSS applications, attitude control systems and Formation Flying. In 2014, he was appointed the full member of the IAA.

C2.4 Paolo Santini Memorial Lecture: Safety of Spaceflight Structures – The Application of Fracture and Damage Control

Gerben Sinnema

Structural Engineer,
European Space Agency (ESA-ESTEC),
The Netherlands

Symposium: C2. IAF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

Session: 4 – Advanced Materials and Structures for High Temperature Applications

Room: ÖVB 2

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Paolo Santini Memorial Lecture: Safety of Spaceflight Structures – The Application of Fracture and Damage Control

ABSTRACT

Since Apollo it has been necessary to ensure the safety of spaceflight structures by fracture and damage tolerance methods. Fracture and damage control cover a wide range of structural and materials engineering disciplines. This paper will present a brief overview of the history, the current state of art, and new developments in implementing fracture and damage control to assure spaceflight structural integrity.

BIOGRAPHY

Gerben Sinnema is the focal point for fracture control in the Structure, Mechanisms & Materials Division of the European Space Agency at ESTEC. He obtained his mechanical engineering degree in applied mechanics in 1988 from University of Twente in The Netherlands.

He started his nearly 30 year long career in space working on launcher structures at Fokker Space from 1990-1999, before joining ESA. His current responsibilities include implementation and certification of fracture control on structures developed by ESA for manned and unmanned projects. This includes contribution to the tools, methodologies and requirements for fracture control, fracture mechanics and fatigue.

E3.3 Reflections on the Economic Impact of Profit Policies by Public Procurement Authorities in Space and Defence Programmes

Eric Morel

Director of Industry, Procurement and Legal Services ,
European Space Agency (ESA),
France

Symposium: E3. 31st IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE POLICY, REGULATIONS AND ECONOMICS

Session: 3 – Space economy – Stimulating measureable economic activities through space policies and budgets

Room: CCB Franzius

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Reflections on the Economic Impact of Profit Policies by Public Procurement Authorities in Space and Defence Programmes

ABSTRACT

Technological advancements from different sectors feed into the space sector. Innovative and lower cost applications of space are emerging together with new business models, making investment in space more attractive and lucrative. Consequently, there has been a rapid growth of private and non-space commercial firms taking on a greater proportion of space-based activity during the last years, boosting as such the economic impact of space activities. In this context, public procurement authorities may need to evolve to be able to partner effectively with new (and old) space Industry players to consider their return on investment expectations whilst preserving the best value for public expenditure and maintaining an environment for economic growth.

BIOGRAPHY

Eric Morel de Westgaver is currently the Director of Industry, Procurement and Legal Services (D/IPL) of the European Space Agency (ESA) as well as the Head of ESA HQ Paris.

Since joining ESA in 1987, Mr. Morel de Westgaver has served in several functions at the agency, including as Head of the Procurement Department in the Directorate of Resources Management and Industrial Matters; as Director of Procurement, Financial Operations and Legal Affairs; and as Associate Director for Industrial Matters, to which he was nominated by the Director General.

He graduated in Economics from the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.

 

Friday 5 October

B4.9-GTS.5 Practical Debris Mitigation Manual for Developers of Microsatellites and Smaller

Darren McKnight

Technical Director,
Integrity Applications, Inc. (IAI),
United States

Symposium: B4. 25th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

Session: 9-GTS.5 – Small Satellite Missions Global Technical Session

Room: ÖVB 4

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: Practical Debris Mitigation Manual for Developers of Microsatellites and Smaller

ABSTRACT

Orbital debris mitigation is becoming increasingly important as the popularity of using small satellites by governments, industry and academia is increasing. Improvements in technology and reducing the cost of access to space have made it easier to deploy space missions. Small satellite systems can provide significant benefit to STEM research, providing governments with infrastructure and information, and make some new applications financially viable for commercial companies. However the Earth orbital environment is a limited resource, and requires coordination and careful understanding in small satellite implementation in order to ensure long term sustainability of these activities.

The IAA has formulated a study group to bring together a range of advice and practical steps that can be taken to help new and more experienced developers of micro, nano and picosatellites (and smaller) understand their obligations, international guidelines, standards, and national laws related to ensuing they sustainably develop their small satellite missions. The group includes key experts and interest groups, and the outputs will be captured in a manual which will be made openly available.”

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Darren McKnight is Technical Director for Integrity Applications, Inc. (IAI) based in Chantilly, Virginia.  He leads teams to develop solutions across widely disparate domains: space systems, predictive awareness for infectious disease outbreaks, workforce productivity, and orbital debris. Recently, he has focused his research on monitoring and characterizing the risk from catastrosphic debris-generating events due to collisions between massive abandoned rocket bodies and defunct payloads to catalyze debris remediation activities such as active debris removal and just-in-time collision avoidance. He has also served as a Chief Technology Officer, Physics professor, and test engineer during his career.

C4.8-B4.5A Challenges and Opportunities in Space Propulsion for Small Satellites

 

Paolo Lozano

Director, Space Propulsion Laboratory,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT),
United States

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION

Session: 8-B4.5 – Joint Session between IAA and IAF for Small Satellite Propulsion Systems

Room: ZARM 5

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: Challenges and Opportunities in Space Propulsion for Small Satellites

ABSTRACT

Space science and technology is clearly trending towards systems based on the use of small spacecraft, in part because of their reduced costs and development times, but also because of the benefits these systems could provide in terms of their potential for multispectral, persistent and robust data collection. Propulsion is a critical subsystem that is required to achieve the maximum capability of small vehicles, but it is also one of the most challenging to develop and implement, for technical and programmatic reasons. In this talk we present an overview of efforts to provide propulsion to small spacecraft, spanning different technologies and their readiness levels. We focus on electric propulsion as an option for efficient mobility that could enable applications ranging from main propulsion for scientific missions to the deployment of massive small satellite constellations.

BIOGRAPHY

PAULO C. LOZANO is the M. Alemán-Velasco Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT, Director of the Space Propulsion Laboratory and the MIT-Mexico Program. His main interests are in plasma physics, space propulsion, ion beam physics, small satellites and nanotechnology. He received a Young Investigator Program Award from the US Air Force for his work on micro-propulsion and the “Future Mind” award from Quo Science Magazine and the Discovery Channel. Dr. Lozano is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He served on the Asteroid Mitigation and NASA Technology Roadmaps panels of the National Research Council.

C4.10 Green Solutions for Space Propulsion

Ulrich Gotzig

Head of Product Support,
ArianeGroup,
Germany

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION

Session: 10 – Propulsion Technology (3)

Room: Bremen 3

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: Green Solutions for Space Propulsion

ABSTRACT

Chemical Hydrazine based systems dominate the market for satellite propulsion since several decades but this market is currently in a significant change process.

Green, non-toxic propellants, the maturation of electric propulsion, upcoming mega-constellations, “new space”, “clean space”, exploration missions to moon and mars … all these new requirements  foster and influence the adaptation of the current product portfolio but also give opportunities for new technologies to be developed.

This paper gives an industry view about space propulsion in Europe with the focus on a changing market and trends for green solutions for the future.

BIOGRAPHY

Education / Training:

  • Graduated as Dipl. Ing. Aerospace Engineering Technical University of Stuttgart in 1990
  • Expert for Orbital propulsion since 2005

Position

  • Joined MBB Lampoldshausen in 1990 as Test Engineer
  • Since 2009 Lead Engineer for monopropellant and bipropellant thruster engineering and production
  • Since 2012 Project Manager for Alternative Propellant R&D program within Ariane Group

Since 2017 Head of Product Support