Keynotes

 

There will be 33 Symposium Keynotes to present at IAC 2019, kindly find the full list including abstracts and biographies below.

 

Monday 21 October

Afternoon Session

A3.1 NASA Science under the National Space Exploration Campaign

James Green

Chief Scientist,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: A3. IAF SPACE EXPLORATION SYMPOSIUM

Session:  1 – Space Exploration Overview

Room: 146B

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: NASA Science under the National Space Exploration Campaign

ABSTRACT

With the signing of Space Policy Directive-1 (SPD-1) in December of 2017, NASA was directed to explore “across the solar system and to bring back to Earth new knowledge and opportunities.”  Charged to lead an expanded, sustainable program of human exploration with international and commercial partners, NASA’s response to SPD-1 was to develop the National Space Exploration Campaign, which serves as a roadmap of plans to expand human activities in LEO and presence to the moon, to Mars, and to deep space. The campaign has five strategic objectives. This paper will provide an overview of NASA’s scientific activities currently underway to support these objectives, including how various programs are aligned to promote collaboration for successful scientific outcomes. Future potential scientific trajectories within the agency will also be discussed.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. James Green is the NASA Chief Scientist. He received his Ph.D. in Space Physics in 1979 and began working at NASA, where he developed and managed NASA’s first Internet, the Space Physics Analysis Network. His positions at NASA include serving as head of the National Space Science Data Center at Goddard Space Flight Center, Chief of the Space Science Data Operations Office, and Chief of the Science Proposal Support Office. From August 2006 to April 2018, James was the Director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters. Under his leadership, more than a dozen planetary missions have been successfully executed.

B1.1 Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS): 2019 Report of Activities to the International Astronautical Congress

D.K. Das

Director, Space Applications Centre,
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO),
India

Symposium: B1. IAF EARTH OBSERVATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 1 – International Cooperation in Earth Observation Missions

Room: 147A

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS): 2019 Report of Activities to the International Astronautical Congress

ABSTRACT

As the CEOS Chair, The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of CEOS. This presentation will deepen awareness of and support for its Earth observation missions, data, and activities, their global relevance and benefits. ISRO will describe key initiatives undertaken in 2019 by the CEOS Chair and CEOS Strategic Implementation Team and other highlights of the CEOS organization. CEOS ensures international coordination of civil space-based Earth observation programs and promotes exchange of data to optimize societal benefit and inform decision making for securing a prosperous and sustainable future for humankind. CEOS currently encompasses 62 Agencies operating 170 satellites.

BIOGRAPHY

Shri D K Das is a graduate in Electronics Engineering.
He started his career at ISRO in 1983 in the area of Communication & Navigation Satellite technology. He made an outstanding contribution towards Assembly, Integration and Checkout of over 30 payloads for INSAT/GSAT satellites.
As an Associate Programme Director he has led many Communication Satellite Payload, such as the constellation of NavIC, Satcom and Navigation Payload Area.
Since July 2018, he is designated as Director, Space Applications Centre.
He is a recipient of ISRO-ASI for his contribution in the area of Spacecraft, ISRO Merit Award and ISRO Performance Excellence Award.

 

B3.1 NASA’s Moon to Mars Exploration Plans

Kenneth Bowersox

Acting Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: B3. IAF HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT SYMPOSIUM

Session: 1 – Governmental Human Spaceflight Programs (Overview)

Room: 151A

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: NASA’s Moon to Mars Exploration Plans

ABSTRACT

Building on 60 years of exploration experience, NASA will push the boundaries of human exploration forward to the Moon and on to Mars. NASA is working to establish a permanent human presence on the Moon within the next decade to uncover new scientific discoveries and lay the foundation for private companies to build a lunar economy. This paper will examine how NASA will 1) get to the Moon using the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, 2) build the Gateway in orbit around the Moon and demonstrate its capabilities in space 3) begin to develop increasingly larger, and reusable landers for humans 4) use the Moon’s unique science platform to advance our understanding of our home planet and our solar system, and 5) advance technologies that will prepare humanity for future exploration to Mars. With the work underway, the agency will move deeper into the solar system with its partners to achieve the ambitious exploration goals.

BIOGRAPHY

Ken Bowersox is a retired US Naval Aviator, with 19 years of experience at NASA.
Selected to the astronaut corps in 1987, during his five missions, Bowersox has logged over 211 days in space aboard the International Space Station, where he was the mission commander of the 6th expedition. He was also a crew member for the first two Hubble Space Telescope repair flights and two US Microgravity Laboratory flights.
He served as the director of the Johnson Space Center’s Flight Crew Operations Directorate. From 2009-2011, Bowersox was the VP of Astronaut Safety and Mission Assurance at SpaceX. In February 2019 Ken was appointed as the Deputy Associate Administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate.

 

C4.1 Prometheus: Precursor of Low-cost Rocket Engine

Jérôme Breteau

Head of Future Space Transportation,
European Space Agency (ESA),
France

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 1 – Propulsion System (1)

Room: 143A

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: Prometheus: Precursor of Low-cost Rocket Engine

ABSTRACT

Prometheus is the precursor of a new liquid rocket Engine family designed for low-cost, flexibility and reusability.
The aim of Prometheus project is to design, produce, and test an advanced low-cost 100-tons class LOx/LCH4 reusable Engine in Europe. This Engine, designed for 1M€ recurrent cost, targets also flexibility in operation through variable thrust, multiple ignitions, compatibility to main and upper stage operation, and minimized ground operations before and after flight.
The speakers will focus on Program genesis, programmatic aspects such as Participating States motivations, Industrial Team, organization, demonstration objectives and present shortly the status of activities, and will give the perspective for the applications and some lessons learned.

BIOGRAPHY

Jérôme Breteau is Head of the Future Space Transportation systems preparation team at the Space Transportation Directorate at ESA Headquarters in Paris. He graduated in Aeronautics and Space propulsion in 1991 from Ecole Nationale Supérieure de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace (ENSAE) in France. He joined the European Space Agency as propulsion engineer in 2005 in the Future Launchers Preparatory Programme of the Launcher Directorate, becoming Propulsion Manager in 2009 and Programme Manager in 2013 along with the development of this programme.

D2.1 Falcon Launch Vehicle Lessons Learned and Reusability

Gary Henry

Senior Director of National Security Space Solutions,
SpaceX,
United States

Symposium: D2. IAF SPACE TRANSPORTATION SOLUTIONS AND INNOVATIONS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 1 – Launch Vehicles in Service or in Development

Room: 146C

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: Falcon Launch Vehicle Lessons Learned and Reusability

ABSTRACT

Gary Henry will discuss the status and progress of the Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy vehicles, with emphasis on some of the key lessons learned from flying boosters multiple times.

BIOGRAPHY

Gary Henry joined SpaceX in February 2019 as senior director of National Security Space Solutions.
Prior to joining SpaceX in 2019, Gary was Senior Director at Phantom Works Space Systems.
His responsibilities included transitioning research and development programs into operational prototypes and objective capabilities for space and other special missions.
Prior to joining Boeing, Gary served for 27 years of active duty service with the United States Air Force, as the commander, Launch and Range Systems Wing, responsible for the execution and operation of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle and Launch & Test Range programs for the USAF Space and Missile Systems Center in his final assignment.

E1.1 STEM Education: Lessons learned from the Challenger Center

Denise Kopecky

Vice President of Education,
Challenger Center for Space Science Education,
United States

Symposium: E1. IAF SPACE EDUCATION AND OUTREACH SYMPOSIUM

Session: 1 – Ignition – Primary Space Education

Room: 144C

Time: 15:00

 

KEYNOTE: STEM Education: Lessons learned from the Challenger Center

ABSTRACT

Today’s students are tomorrow’s innovators, but too many lose interest in STEM subjects at an early age. This limits their academic achievement in these subjects and ultimately, their opportunities in life. Low engagement in STEM also has an impact on our society’s economic and social well-being.
Challenger Center is on a mission to broaden the pipeline of students that are interested and prepared to fill the jobs of tomorrow. Ms. Kopecky will discuss the importance of STEM in elementary school and provide hands-on, practical ways for experts to connect students to real-world STEM experiences.

BIOGRAPHY

Denise Kopecky leads Challenger Center’s team of education and technology experts whose work is at the core of the organization’s STEM education mission. She oversees the development and implementation of all education products and programs, and manages relationships with program collaborators. Ms. Kopecky is a member of the Senior Leadership team, providing direction on all strategic and operational issues to ensure to meet Challenger Center’s strategic goals.
Ms. Kopecky spent 13 years in the classroom. Ms. Kopecky holds a professional certification in Instructional Design from University of Wisconsin-Stout, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, and a Master of Teaching from Virginia Commonwealth University.

 

Tuesday 22 October

Morning Session

A3.2A An Overview of NASA’s Lunar Science Exploration Plans for Artemis

Steve Clarke

Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration,
Science Mission Directorate,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: A3. IAF SPACE EXPLORATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 2A – Moon Exploration – Part 1

Room: 146B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: An Overview of NASA’s Lunar Science Exploration Plans for Artemis

ABSTRACT

An overview of NASA’s lunar science exploration activities in support of the new Artemis program. This includes the Commercial Lunar Payload Services, NASA lunar instruments, and the lunar polar volatiles prospector rover mission being planned for the 2022-23 timeframe – goals, objectives, and current status.

BIOGRAPHY

Steve Clarke is the Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration in NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. He serves as the agency’s interface between the NASA mission directorates, the scientific community, and other external stakeholders in developing a strategy to enable an integrated approach for robotic and human exploration within NASA’s Exploration Campaign.
Mr. Clarke has received numerous awards including the Presidential Rank Award and NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal for outstanding leadership.
He has a BS degree in engineering and a MS degree in engineering management from the University of Central Florida.

 

C4.3 Propulsion Technology Development Activities at NASA

George Schmidt

Head of Propulsion,
Glenn Research Center,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 3 – Propulsion Technology (1)

Room: 143A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Propulsion Technology Development Activities at NASA

ABSTRACT

This presentation will provide an overview of all the current propulsion technology development activities taking place at NASA. It will cover all the work being performed at the principal NASA field centers responsible for propulsion system research and development for space applications, particularly Glenn Research Center and Marshall Space Flight Center. The technologies that will be addressed include chemical propulsion using cryogenic propellants, nuclear thermal propulsion and electric propulsion. The presentation will also describe current work in developing technologies to enable extraction, processing and utilization of lunar and extraterrestrial resources for propellant. In addition to outlining the cur-rent NASA projects focused on NASA technology, the presentation will also address the key challenges associated with the development of these technologies, especially at the component and subsystem level.

BIOGRAPHY

George Schmidt is the Chief Technologist of the NASA Glenn Research Center. He is also the Deputy Director of Glenn’s Research and Technology Directorate, which conducts a broad range of research and technology development projects in space propulsion, aeropropulsion, power, communications, materials and structures, instrumentation and physical sciences. Prior to this assignment, he served as Manager of the Propulsion Research Center at Marshall Space Flight Center and as Deputy Manager of Marshall’s Test Laboratory.
Dr. Schmidt spent several years at NASA Headquarters and started his NASA career in 1989. Prior to that, he worked at Booz-Allen & Hamilton and Boeing Aerospace.

D1.2 Mission and Spacecraft Design Challenges of the Sun-Earth L5 Point Lagrange Space Weather Monitoring Mission

Rolf Janovsky

Director Predevelopment, Space System Studies & Proposals,
OHB System AG,
Germany

Symposium: D1. IAF SPACE SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 2 – Space Systems Architectures

Room: 145B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Mission and Spacecraft Design Challenges of the Sun-Earth L5 Point Lagrange Space Weather Monitoring Mission

ABSTRACT

As part of its SSA Programme, ESA has initiated a study to define an operational system to monitor, predict and disseminate space weather information. It will generate alerts to a wide user community in sectors like space-based communications, human spaceflight, broadcasting, and many others.
A key asset will be a space-based observatory, to be placed at the Sun-Earth L5 point.
This paper will present an in-depth discussion of the mission and spacecraft design challenges. A distinguishing feature is that it will be the first ever deep-space mission providing an operational service. The resulting implications on the spacecraft design and autonomy will be highlighted in this paper.
From a mission point of view, a narrow orbit about the L5 point needs to be established by means of a suitable transfer and manoeuvre strategy. This fixed geometry has several implications on the spacecraft and its subsystems, which will be elaborated in this paper.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Rolf Janovsky is currently the Director for Predevelopment, Space System Studies & Proposals of OHB System AG in Bremen, one of the three largest space system integrators in Europe. In his position, he is responsible for mission and spacecraft studies until the transition to the implementation phase, including ESA’s future Lagrange Space Weather Mission. Dr. Janovsky has previously headed different future programmes departments at OHB since 2001. Rolf Janovsky has obtained a doctoral degree from RWTH in Aachen, Germany and is also a board member of the German Aerospace Society (DGLR).

E7.1 International Cooperation Mechanisms in Outer Space Activities for the Next Decade

Setsuko Aoki

Professor of Law,
Keio University Law School,
Japan

Symposium: E7. IISL COLLOQUIUM ON THE LAW OF OUTER SPACE

Session: 1 – Dr. Jasentuliyana Keynote Lecture by a Leading Space Law Expert and IISL Young Scholars Session

Room: 152A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: International Cooperation Mechanisms in Outer Space Activities for the Next Decade

ABSTRACT

This keynote presents lessons learned from various international space cooperation mechanisms including scientific exploration, space application, commercial activities and security-related activities. Research covers bilateral, multilateral, regional and UN-based cooperative measures. Best practices seem to indicate that bilateral cooperation accomplishes its goals when appropriate implementing arrangements are made based on the already-existed framework agreements, and a big multilateral project would be successful through the combination of a legally binding instrument and several types of non-legally binding instruments. The legally binding instrument in a big project seems to correspond to the implementing arrangement in case of bilateral cooperation mechanisms in nature. This implies that a framework agreement does not yet exist in multilateral exploration project. Thus, this presentation will submit a model framework agreement in a next decade multilateral exploration project as a food for thought to promote faster and facilitated cooperation.

BIOGRAPHY

With an LL.B. (in 1983) and LL.M. (1985) from Faculty of Law and Graduate School of Law at Keio University (Japan) and D.C.L. in Air & Space Law at McGill University (in 1993), Prof. Setsuko Aoki is Professor of Law, Keio University Law School and Vice Director of the Institute of Space Law, Keio University since April 2016. Her previous positions include Professor, Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University and Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences, National Defense Academy of Japan. She is currently a member of Committee on National Space Policy (CNSP) under the Cabinet Office.

Afternoon Session

D1.3 BepiColombo – The State of Art for the Exploration of Mercury

Mauro Patroncini

Project Manager,
Thales Alenia Space,
Italy

Symposium: D1. IAF SPACE SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 3 – Technologies to Enable Space Systems

Room: 145B

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: BepiColombo – The State of Art for the Exploration of Mercury

ABSTRACT

BepiColombo represents the first European mission to explore the planet Mercury, so far visited only by NASA.
With BepiColombo, an Interdisciplinary Mission to the planet Mercury, in collaboration between ESA and ISAS/JAXA of Japan, the ESA’s goal is to carry out a complete and systematic mapping of the planet.
It might be thought that Mercury has so far been a bit neglected by space explorations because it is less interesting than Mars, Venus or Saturn, already visited by previous scientific ESA missions, but is not so.
The reason lies in the fact that Mercury is an extreme difficult planet to explore, due to its extraordinarily hostile environment in terms of thermal radiations, ultraviolet and ionized particles flow.
This paper intends to give an overview of the BepiColombo Mission characteristics, objectives, challenges, together with a summary of the technology development and effort that has been required in particular to Thales Alenia Space – Italy, to develop and qualify such complex Satellite.

BIOGRAPHY

Mauro Patroncini, born in Torino – Italy on December 13th, 1958 and graduated in Electronic Engineering at the Politecnico di Torino in 1983. Since 1983 he has been working in Thales Alenia Space in Turin, formerly called Aeritalia then Alenia Spazio, where he has held several positions. In particular, until 2000 he has been responsible for defining Ground Support Equipment and managing the Assembly, Integration and Testing for Hipparcos, Tethered and SAX Satellites. Since 2001 he has been responsible as Thales Alenia Space Project Manager for Mars Express, Venus Express and BepiColombo Scientific satellites.

D4.3 The ASU Interplanetary Initiative: Advancing Society Through Exploration

Linda Elkins-Tanton

Managing Director and Foundation Professor,
Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration,
United States

Symposium: D4. 17th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON VISIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR THE FUTURE

Session: 3 – Space Elevator Critical Technology Verification and Validation Testing

Room: 144B

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: The ASU Interplanetary Initiative: Advancing Society Through Exploration

ABSTRACT

Creating a positive human space future necessitates that we connect all disciplines — we need sociology, philosophy, art, and so much more, in addition to science, engineering, and law. The Interplanetary Initiative is a pan-university venture at Arizona State University that is pioneering a new model for integrated research and learning, to investigate, communicate, and define our human space future. We connect the private sector, universities, and government, and we train students how to solve problems and create knowledge both in teams and in the classroom.  In our two full years of operation we have created an experimental innovative research team-building process, seed-funded ~20 projects including over 250 active team members and 20 outside partners, and achieved ~10x return on investment in external funding. In this talk I will discuss our structure, process, and opportunities for teaming, and discuss the application of our process to examples including an international space elevator.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Lindy Elkins-Tanton is Managing Director and Co-Chair of the Interplanetary Initiative at ASU, co-founder of Beagle Learning, and the Principal Investigator of the Psyche mission, selected in 2017 as the 14th in NASA’s Discovery program.  Her research includes theory, observation, and experiments concerning terrestrial planetary formation, magma oceans, and subsequent planetary evolution. She promotes and participates in education initiatives, in particular, inquiry and exploration teaching methodologies, and leadership and team-building for scientists and engineers. Professor Elkins-Tanton received her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from MIT.

 

Wednesday 23 October

Morning Session

A3.3A Mars Sample Return Mission Concept Status

Brian Muirhead

Pre-project Manager of MSR,
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),
United States

Symposium: A3. IAF SPACE EXPLORATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 3A – Mars Exploration – missions current and future

Room: 146B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Mars Sample Return Mission Concept Status

ABSTRACT

This paper will provide an overview of current options and specific concepts for a potential Mars Sample Return (MSR) architecture being jointly studied by NASA and ESA.  Overall objectives and mission options will be described, including the architecture’s constraints and notional timelines.  The paper will highlight architecture-level trade studies, including specific elements and their status.  The overall Sample Retrieval Lander (SRL) mission concept, including vehicle options will be described, including the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), Sample Fetch Rover (being studied by ESA), Orbiting Sample container (OS), and tube transfer robotics systems.  The concept and status of the Earth Return Orbiter (ERO) mission, being studied by ESA, and the Capture/Containment and Return System (CCRS) which would be the payload on the ERO, will be discussed.

BIOGRAPHY

Brian Muirhead has 40 years of experience in development and leadership of projects at NASA’s JPL. He was the flight system manager of the Mars Pathfinder mission. He was the Project Manager of the Deep Impact mission. He was the Chief Engineer of the Mars Science Laboratory until August 2004. He was named Chief Engineer of JPL in 2004. In February, 2007 Brian was named the Program Systems Engineer for the Constellation Program. Brian is currently leading the study of NASA’s Mars Sample Return campaign.
He is the recipient of two of NASA’s Outstanding Leadership Medals for his work on Mars Pathfinder and Constellation.

C1.4 Astrodynamics of Lunar and Cis-Lunar Missions

David C. Folta

Flight Dynamics Engineer,
Goddard Space Flight Center,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: C1. IAF ASTRODYNAMICS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – Orbital Dynamics (2)

Room: 150A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Astrodynamics of Lunar and Cis-Lunar Missions

ABSTRACT

The Breakwell Memorial Lecture has been given during the IAF Astrodynamics Symposium since1994. This award is attributed to the persons for their outstanding contributions to Astrodynamics. During the 70th IAC, the Breakwell Lecture is delivered by David Folta, an Aerospace Engineer in the Navigation and Mission Design Branch at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) where he leads multiple NASA missions, chairs engineering review panels, and develops innovative technologies across the full spectrum of mission types.

BIOGRAPHY

Mr. Folta leads flight dynamics support for multiple NASA missions, develops astrodynamics technologies, and collaborates with universities on innovative research. He provides operational navigation and guidance expertise to flight projects, and directs research on topics such as dynamical systems and formation flying for trajectory design applications.  He is currently the GSFC Mission Design and Navigation Lead for the Mars mission, MAVEN, the Lunar IceCube mission, and libration orbit missions. Mr. Folta is Chair of the Goddard Senior Fellows. Awards include NASA’s premier honor, the Distinguished Service Medal and Goddard’s foremost engineering award, the Moe I. Schneebaum Memorial Award.

C2.4 Paolo Santini’s Memorial Lecture: Ablators from Apollo to Future Missions to Moon, Mars, and Beyond

Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Senior Technologist for the Entry System Technologies,
Ames Research Center,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium:  C2. IAF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – Advanced Materials and Structures for High Temperature Applications

Room: 152B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Paolo Santini’s Memorial Lecture: Ablators from Apollo to Future Missions to Moon, Mars, and Beyond

ABSTRACT

When Apollo was designed to carry astronauts safely back from the Moon, at return speeds exceeding 11 km/s, it required development of a new lightweight ablative material to protect the capsule and crew from the intense heat of entry. Soon after the Apollo program, successful Mars Viking Lander missions employed a different and much lighter ablator in more benign entry conditions.   The Pioneer-Venus and Galileo Probe missions that followed required yet another ablative system, to manage the extreme heating at those destinations.  In the mid 1990’s, as the Science focus returned to Mars, advances in manufacturing, testing and materials technology led to innovative lightweight ablators that enabled comet and asteroid sample return missions and facilitated large lander missions such as MSL and Mars 2020. This talk will review the history of ablators as well as current ablative TPS development that addresses the requirements for future missions to Moon, Mars and beyond.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Ethiraj Venkatapathy is currently NASA’s Senior Technologist for the Entry System Technologies. Prior to joining NASA in 2002, was President and Director of Research for ELORET.  He obtained his doctorate in Aerospace Engineering from Iowa State University developing computational fluid-dynamics solvers and predicted 3-dimentional hypersonic flow around Space Shuttle Orbiter before first flight. He is a co-inventor and the Principal Technologist for the ADEPT, a deployable entry system and 3-D MAT, a multi-functional TPS material on Orion Capsule. He received from NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal twice and Exceptional Technology Achievement Medal as well. Associate Fellow of NASA and AIAA.

C4.2 OmegA Launch Vehicle

Kent Rominger

Vice President, OmegA Capture,
Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems,
United States

Symposium:  C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 2 – Propulsion System (2)

Room: 143A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: OmegA Launch Vehicle

ABSTRACT

OmegA is a launch system designed for medium and large payloads for commercial and government payloads. It consists of Intermediate and Heavy Configurations. This keynote will present innovative solid rocket motor technologies and manufacturing techniques that have been incorporated into the vehicle design and manufacturing.

BIOGRAPHY

Kent Rominger is the vice president and capture lead for Northrop Grumman’s OmegA launch system. He joined Northrop Grumman in 2006 and has held multiple leadership roles, including vice president of Strategic Programs, vice president of Strategy and Business Development and vice president of Propulsion Systems’ Test and Research Operations. Prior to his time at Northrop Grumman, Rominger was a NASA astronaut; he flew on five space shuttle missions and logged more than 1,600 hours in space. Rominger also spent 26 years in the U.S. Navy, serving as an F-14 Tomcat pilot and as a Navy test pilot.

C4.4 Lab to Launch

Christine Charles

Professor of the Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory,
The Australian National University,
Australia

Symposium:  C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – Electric Propulsion

Room: 143B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Lab to Launch

ABSTRACT

Thousands of small satellites (such as CubeSats) are expected to be launched over the next decade. Electric propulsion has been an innovative solution in a number of space missions but its scalability remains a challenge. Many mature or under development space propulsion systems could also benefit from more compact and efficient power supplies. Pocket Rocket is an inexpensive Australian-born miniaturised electrothermal radio frequency plasma thruster which uses environmentally friendly propellant such as argon. The Australian Space Agency was recently launched: a complete end-to-end small satellite industry — “Lab to Launch” — is now available wholly within the Trans Australasian Pacific region, thanks to the recent demonstration of Rocket Lab‘s access to orbit and successful commercial launches with the Electron Rocket. Groups at the Australian National University, Stanford University and the University of Auckland have joined forces to pave a path to space heritage for Pocket Rocket via the CubeSat platform.

BIOGRAPHY

Christine Charles is Professor and Head of the Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion laboratory at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. She works on experimental expanding plasmas applied to space science and space propulsion (i.e., Helicon plasma thruster & Pocket Rocket electrothermal thruster). She was recently awarded the 2015 Women in Industry Excellence in Engineering. She has published over 200 articles in various international peer-reviewed journals and her scientific output has been recognised by her Fellowship of the American Physical Society in 2013 and her Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science in 2015.

E1.4 Experience and Findings by Kyushu Institute of Technology to Have a Successful Space Capacity Building Program

Mengu Cho

Professor, Winner of the Frank J. Malina Astronautics Medal,
Kyushu Institute of Technology,
Japan

Symposium: E1. IAF SPACE EDUCATION AND OUTREACH SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – In Orbit – Postgraduate Space Education

Room: 144C

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Experience and Findings by Kyushu Institute of Technology to Have a Successful Space Capacity Building Program

ABSTRACT

Small satellites, especially CubeSats, are ideal entrance for developing countries to join the space sector. There is a strong demand for human resource development programs, i.e. capacity building, through small satellite projects. There have been various training programs offered by institutions in space faring countries. Many programs, however, failed because they had lack of hands-on experience and did not cover the entire satellite system life cycle. The keys to success are to have trainees experience the complete cycle from mission definition to operation and to have strategy for sustainability after the training. Since 2011, Kyushu Institute of Technology (Kyutech) has been engaged in the capacity building activities in collaboration with United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs. In 2013, Kyutech initiated Space Engineering International Course, a post-graduate educational curriculum offered in English. This presentation reviews our past experience and findings with emphasis on importance of hands-on and sustainability.

BIOGRAPHY

Prof. Mengu Cho received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Tokyo, and the Ph.D. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. After working at Kobe University, International Space University, he joined Kyushu Institute of Technology in 1996. He is a Professor, the Director of the Laboratory of Spacecraft Environment Interaction Engineering and the head of Department of Space Systems Engineering. He received Space Development and Utilization Award from Japanese government twice. The satellite project, BIRDS-I, he supervised received 2017 GEDC Airbus Diversity Award in recognition of demonstrating a fine example of bringing diversity to engineering education.

Afternoon Session

B4.5 A 2019 Update on the Impending Small Launch Vehicle Boom

Carlos Niederstrasser

Systems Architect,
Northrop Grumman,
United States

Symposium:  B4. 26th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

Session: 5 – Access to Space for Small Satellite Missions

Room: 151B

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: A 2019 Update on the Impending Small Launch Vehicle Boom

ABSTRACT

The 2010’s has seen a dramatic increase in small launch vehicle contenders, defined as rockets capable of carrying at most 1000 kg to Low Earth Orbit. Spurred on by government programs sponsorship and the perceived exponential growth of CubeSats and nanosatellite constellations, more than 100 different commercial, semi-commercial, and government entities worldwide are now working on new entrants of this class.
Even as secondary slots on larger rockets and CubeSat missions as cargo to the International Space Station proliferate, new entrants continue to emerge looking for a new magic formula that will set them apart from the competition.
With so many potential vehicles in various stages of conception or development, specific trends in performance, cost, and technologies can be identified.  This study compares capabilities, stated mission goals, cost and funding sources, and testing progress of the new vehicles contributing to this new wave of “Launch Fever”.

BIOGRAPHY

Carlos is a Systems Architect with Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, working on strategic activities, new business pursuits, and special initiatives.  Some of the programs Carlos has supported at NGIS include the Mission Extension Pods, the Antares Accident Investigation Board, and the Dawn interplanetary spacecraft.
Carlos is a member of the steering committee for the Khalifa University Space Systems and Technology Program in the UAE.  His annual “Small Launch Vehicle Survey” has become the definitive compendium of world-wide small launcher development efforts.
Carlos holds degrees from Princeton University and Stanford University.

E5.3 The Overview Effect and the Arts

Frank White

Author,
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA),
United States

Symposium: E5. 30th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE AND SOCIETY

Session: 3 – Contemporary Arts Practice and Outer Space: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach

Room: 145A

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: The Overview Effect and the Arts

ABSTRACT

The Overview Effect is an experience of astronauts when they see the Earth from space and in space. Astronauts are typically trained as scientists and engineers, and they often assert that artists should have the Overview Effect experience.
Indeed, the Overview Effect has been an attractive subject for artists of all kinds, from painters to filmmakers to musicians, and more.
For example, Roger Goula, a London-based composer, has created a symphony called “Overview Effect.”
Daniela De Paulis launched the COGITO project which, among other things, monitors the brainwaves of subjects as they view images of the Earth.
What draws so many artists to the Overview Effect?
Even more important may be the question of how the arts might be used to “bring the Overview Effect down to Earth,” transforming the awareness of the vast majority of the population.

BIOGRAPHY

Frank White is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard College. He earned an M.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University.
White’s best-known book, The Overview Effect: Space Exploration and Human Evolution, is considered by many to be a seminal work in the field of space exploration.
The fourth edition of The Overview Effect is scheduled for publication in 2020.
White considers himself to be a “space philosopher,” and has long advocated developing a new philosophy of space exploration. His book on this topic, The Cosma Hypothesis: Implications of the Overview Effect, was published in March 2019.

 

Thursday 24 October

Morning Session

A2.4 Fluid Physics from International Space Station

Satoshi Matsumoto

Associate Senior Researcher, Human Spaceflight Technology Directorate,
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA),
Japan

Symposium:  A2. IAF MICROGRAVITY SCIENCES AND PROCESSES SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – Science Results from Ground Based Research

Room: 143C

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Fluid Physics from International Space Station

ABSTRACT

The International Space Station (ISS) provides a great opportunity to conduct experiments that can only be achieved there.  Usually, we are conducting experiments assuming gravity without consciousness. However, in an environment where gravity does not act, it is possible to observe the phenomena more simply and it will be helpful for understanding the true nature.  Disappearing the buoyant effect is one of most remarkable in microgravity.  The buoyancy convection induced by density difference often appear in materials processing, combustion, and even in cell in life sciences, which means that the fluid physics deeply relates such things.

20 years at NASA, 10 years for JAXA and ESA have passed after starting to utilize the ISS for progress of science and technology.  The experiment in fluid physics utilizing the ISS in each space agency will be introduced and the benefits, values, prospects of the ISS in fluid physics will be presented.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Satoshi Matsumoto is an associate senior researcher in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and a professor of University of Tsukuba.  He has engaged in microgravity experiments as a project scientist as well as a researcher for more than 20 years. He also served as an increment manager to oversee the planning and implementation of ISS experiments. He is exchanging information about experiments in each country based on international human relations built through those works. Recently, his work has expanded to R&D of the environment control and life support system (ECLSS) for future Deep Space Gateway, Moon and Mars exploration.

C2.6 DISCOVERER – Making Commercial Satellite Operations in Very Low Earth Orbits a Reality

Peter C.E Roberts

Lecturer,
The University of Manchester,
United Kingdom

Symposium:  C2. IAF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES SYMPOSIUM

Session: 6 – Space Environmental Effects and Spacecraft Protection

Room: 152B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: DISCOVERER – Making Commercial Satellite Operations in Very Low Earth Orbits a Reality

ABSTRACT

DISCOVERER is a Euro Horizon 2020 funded project developing technologies to enable commercially-viable sustained operation of satellites in very low Earth orbits. Why operate closer to the Earth? For communications applications latency is significantly reduced and link budgets improved, and for remote sensing improved link budgets allow higher-resolution or smaller instruments, all providing cost benefits. In addition, all applications benefit from increased launch mass to lower altitudes, whilst end-of-life removal is ensured due to the increased atmospheric drag. However, this drag must also be minimised and compensated for. One of the key technologies being developed by DISCOVERER is a material that encourages specular reflection of the residual atmosphere at these altitudes. Combined with appropriate geometric designs these can significantly reduce drag, provide usable lift for aerodynamic attitude and orbit control, and improve the collection efficiency of aerodynamic intakes for atmosphere breathing electric propulsion systems, also being developed as part of DISCOVERER.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Peter Roberts is the scientific and program coordinator of the Horizon 2020 funded DISCOVERER program, a 5.7M€ research project which aims to redesign remote sensing satellites for sustained operation at significantly lower altitudes. Currently he is the Space Theme Lead at the University of Manchester Aerospace Research Institute, and the Director of Research for the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering. He obtained his doctorate at Cranfield University studying drag-free control for a space-based gravitational wave detector. He was the lead design engineer for Icarus, the world’s first spacecraft end-of-life drag-enhancement deorbit device.

Afternoon Session

A3.5 Execution of Parker Solar Probe’s Unprecedented Flight to the Sun and Early Results

Yanping Guo

Mission Design Section Supervisor,
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL),
United States

Symposium:  A3. IAF SPACE EXPLORATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 5 – Solar System Exploration including Ocean Worlds

Room: 146B

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: Execution of Parker Solar Probe’s Unprecedented Flight to the Sun and Early Results

ABSTRACT

Parker Solar Probe (PSP) was launched on August 12, 2018, on its way to enter the solar corona and “touch” the Sun. We utilize enormous planetary gravity assists from 7 repeated Venus flybys via a V7GA trajectory in 24 solar orbits over 7 years, in order to get within 8.86 solar radii from the Sun’s surface.  The probe successfully entered the V7GA trajectory and made the first Venus flyby 52 days after launch. Five weeks later it flew by the Sun at a perihelion distance of 0.167 AU, setting new records as the closest craft to the Sun and the fastest manmade object. In this paper, the overall strategy for PSP’s flight execution concerning in-flight trajectory control and re-optimization, orbit determination and navigation, and trajectory correction maneuvers will be presented. The performance of PSP’s launch and initial flight, including the first Venus flyby and first solar encounter, will be reported.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Yanping Guo is a Principal Professional Staff and Mission Design Section supervisor at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. She is the Mission Design and Navigation Manager of NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Mission, and the Mission Design Lead of NASA’s New Horizons Mission. Dr. Guo is a member of the AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee (Committee Chair, 2012-2014) and a member of the International Symposium Space Flight Dynamics (ISSFD) Program Committee.

B3.7 From LEO to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond: Shaping Capability Development Strategies for NASA’s Human Exploration Campaign

Kathleen Boggs

System and Technology Demonstration Manager,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium:  B3. IAF HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT SYMPOSIUM

Session: 7 – Advanced Systems, Technologies, and Innovations for Human Spaceflight

Room: 151A

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: From LEO to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond: Shaping Capability Development Strategies for NASA’s Human Exploration Campaign

ABSTRACT

This paper describes key human spaceflight capabilities that must be advanced to enable NASA’s exploration goals. The paper addresses the importance and application of these capabilities to deep space human spaceflight. We discuss the activities required to advance critical exploration capabilities, the means of demonstrating system performance, and implementation planning, including selection of flight test location based upon the unique environments and characteristics of the ISS, Gateway, and potential lunar surface habitats. The optimal strategy will be a combination of ISS/LEO, Gateway, and lunar surface testing; however, not all capabilities require all these steps on their path to deep space exploration missions.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Kathleen Gallagher Boggs serves as the Systems and Technology Demonstration Manager in the International Space Station Division of the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA. Her focus is on strategy for development and demonstration of technologies critical to enable deep space missions to destinations such as the Moon and Mars. Dr. Boggs holds a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a Ph.D. in Physics from Trinity College Dublin, where her work focused on development of high temperature ferromagnetic nanomaterials.

E4.3 A Girl in the Man-on-the-Moon Program: Camaraderie and Discrimination in the Apollo Era

Rhoda Shaller Hornstein

Retired,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium:  E4. 53rd IAA HISTORY OF ASTRONAUTICS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 3 – “Can you believe they put a man on the moon?” The Apollo Program

Room: 147B

Time: 14:45

 

KEYNOTE: A Girl in the Man-on-the-Moon Program: Camaraderie and Discrimination in the Apollo Era

ABSTRACT

The author reported for duty 51 years ago to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. As an entry level Aerospace Technologist, her role in Apollo 11 was to operate the Goddard Real Time System to record radar data from the tracking sites and use this data to update the orbit and send out acquisition messages.
The author’s fondest memory of the Apollo program, especially Apollo 11, was that, with less than one year of Government service, she had the opportunity to work among the “giants” of NASA and experience firsthand the “Apollo Mentality” that guided her through 46 years at NASA.
She also experienced the highs of camaraderie and the lows of discrimination. The camaraderie lasted one year until a manager asked why she was not pregnant. Thus began the discrimination, more specifically gender harassment.This paper addresses how the “girl” accommodated both behaviors through the lens of the “Apollo Mentality” during her NASA career.

BIOGRAPHY

During her 46-year career with NASA, Rhoda Hornstein was a leader who achieved an impressive record of technical accomplishments. Upon her retirement in 2014, the NASA Administrator wrote, “You can be proud of how you applied your engineering ingenuity and influence to achieve national space program initiatives in human spaceflight and robotic science missions; the supporting tracking networks and data systems; and more recently the expendable launch services necessary for access to space.”
She is the author of 50 publications and recipient of numerous awards including two NASA Exceptional Service Medals, Silver Snoopy Astronauts Award, Federal 100 Information Technology Award, and IAF Distinguished Service Award for leadership of the Small Satellite Missions Symposium.

 

Friday 25 October

Morning Session

B1.6 50 Years of Earth Observations: The contribution to sustainable development goals and plans for the future

Lawrence Friedl

Director, Applied Sciences Program,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: B1. IAF EARTH OBSERVATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 6 – 50 years of Earth observation: The contribution to sustainable development goals and plans for the future

Room: 144C

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: 50 Years of Earth Observations: The contribution to sustainable development goals and plans for the future

ABSTRACT

This presentation will provide a broad overview of the role of satellite based earth observations contributing to UN sustainable development goals and plans for the future. It will cover the over 50 years of increasingly capable satellite observations, how they were developed, how applications to sustainable development goals were developed and how they have been used for monitoring the use of planet resources and impacts on sustainability. The talk will cover climate, environment, urban areas, water, land, ocean and cryosphere concentrating on how humanity has addressed sustainability issues and how Earth Observations from space have helped. Finally, the presentation will address plans for the future.

BIOGRAPHY

Lawrence Friedl serves as the director of the Applied Sciences Program within the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters. The Program supports efforts to discover and demonstrate innovative and practical applications of Earth science by government, business, and other organizations. He has been with NASA since 2002.
Among his responsibilities, Lawrence is a Vice-Chair of the interagency U.S. Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) and represents the United States on the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO). Prior to joining NASA, Lawrence worked at the US Environmental Protection Agency, focusing on applications of geospatial data and technology.

B4.8 MarCO: Flight Results from the First Interplanetary CubeSat Mission

Andrew Klesh

Mission Architect,
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),
United States

Symposium:  B4. 26th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

Session: 8 – Small Spacecraft for Deep-Space Exploration

Room: 151B

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: MarCO: Flight Results from the First Interplanetary CubeSat Mission

ABSTRACT

Launched May 5th, 2018, the MarCO spacecraft have demonstrated that small spacecraft can operate in the deep space environment. The spacecraft successfully performed multiple trajectory correction maneuvers to achieve its flyby of Mars.
By choosing an advantageous angle, MarCO-B was able to simultaneously image the Earth and Moon at a distance of approximately 1 million kilometers. This vantage point exemplifies some of the usecases of low-cost explorers, including providing observational capability that a larger explorer might not be able to provide on its own.
On November 26, 2018, the MarCO spacecraft successfully flew by Mars while relaying entry-descentand-landing telemetry for the InSight vehicle. Both spacecraft performed beyond expectations and were able to provide a real-time link for the so-called “seven minutes of terror”.
Many lessons have been derived from the MarCO mission. From planetary protection to low cost ops, MarCO is paving the way to a new generation of explorers.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Andrew Klesh is chief engineer of the MarCO interplanetary mission, consisting of the first two CubeSats flying beyond Earth. He also serves as technical lead of the Buoyant Rover for Under-Ice Exploration team, working to explore the ice-water interface in arctic, antarctic, and glacial terrain. Previously, he served as PI for the INSPIRE interplanetary CubeSats, and was postdoc & chief engineer of U. Michigan’s Radio Aurora Explorer CubeSat project. Prior to JPL, he served as a Postdoctoral Fellow at JAXA supporting the Hayabusa and Ikaros missions.

C4.9 Test Complex M11: Research on Future Orbital Propulsion Systems and Scramjet Engines

Marius Wilhelm

Research Engineer,
German Aerospace Center (DLR),
Germany

Symposium:  C4. IAF SPACE PROPULSION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 9 – Hypersonic Air-breathing and Combined Cycle Propulsion

Room: 143A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Test Complex M11: Research on Future Orbital Propulsion Systems and Scramjet Engines

ABSTRACT

Test Complex M11 is a part of the Institute of Space Propulsion of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the European Research and Test Site for Chemical Space Propulsion Systems in Lampoldshausen. Test Complex M11 is home of the Department of Propellants, where research and test activities are focused on advanced storable propellants for satellites and orbital propulsion systems to replace hydrazines in the whole operational range.
A short historical overview of test complex M11 will be given. Main criteria for propellants selections based on mission targets shall furthermore be given and discussed. Research activities for supersonic and hypersonic flows for Ramjet and Scramjet engines research activities are presented. Research and development work, infrastructure of the test complex with its 6 testbeds will be presented with its test envelopes and a short overview over planned modifications for the next decade will be given.

BIOGRAPHY

Mr. Marius Wilhelm joined the DLR-Institute of Space Propulsion in 2014. During that time he was allocated inside the advanced nozzles group responsible for automation and software analysis of nozzle and flow tests with Schlieren high speed imaging. Afterwards he worked in the gel propellants group investigating low frequency combustion instabilities. In 2015 he has been working on liquid high energy monopropellants. Research work was especially done on thermal ignition, spray, ignition and combustion behavior. In 2016 he became part of the test facilities group and has been responsible for design and construction of M11 vacuum test facility for research on advanced orbital propulsion systems.

E6.4 Managing Risk in the Effort to Maintain Orbital Sustainability

Chris Blackerby

Group COO & Director,
Astroscale,
Japan

Symposium: E6. IAF BUSINESS INNOVATION SYMPOSIUM

Session: 4 – Strategic Risk Management for Successful Space & Defence Programmes

Room: 144A

Time: 09:45

 

KEYNOTE: Managing Risk in the Effort to Maintain Orbital Sustainability

ABSTRACT

Removing existing orbital debris and mitigating the creation of future debris is one of the most fundamental issues of the emerging space economy. Space-related industries and government entities are in an increasingly difficult situation: the risk inherent in performing missions to remove potentially catastrophic debris from orbit is matched only by the risk of inaction to the problem.
Astroscale is one of the few companies in the world proposing to aid in the removal of orbital debris through the provision of End of Life and Active Debris Removal services. While Astroscale is currently developing its first mission, we are also making active contributions to policy discussions and helping to develop a marketplace for debris removal. Coordination between the private sector and government will be essential in order to establish norms and standards to create an industry that reduces the risk of collisions in orbit, as well as making servicing missions as safe as possible.

BIOGRAPHY

Chris Blackerby is Group Chief Operating Officer for Astroscale, a venture-backed company dedicated to removal of debris from space in order to create a more sustainable orbital environment.  In this role Chris oversees all activities, from strategic planning to internal management.
Previously Chris was the NASA Attaché in Asia based at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo from 2012-2017. In that capacity he facilitated cooperation, served as senior strategic space advisor, negotiated agreements and resolved disputes with partners.

Chris began working for NASA as a Presidential Management Fellow in 2003.

E1.8 NASA Science Activation

Kristen J. Erickson

Director, Science Engagement and Partnerships,
Science Mission Directorate,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),
United States

Symposium: E1. IAF SPACE EDUCATION AND OUTREACH SYMPOSIUM

Session: 8 – Hands-on Space Education and Outreach

Room: ISZ

Time: 12:45

 

KEYNOTE: NASA Science Activation

ABSTRACT

In 2016, NASA’s Science Activation program competitively awarded 27 institutions to enable NASA content and science experts into the learning environment more effectively and efficiently with learners of all ages. Addressing community needs, the teams cooperate with NASA to meet four objectives as verified by independent evaluators. Currently, there is a network of over 200 partners to maximize collective impact of NASA’s $45M/year investment. All science disciplines are mapped to Earth and Space Science education standards. Education technologies and digital learning avenues contribute to the collective impact and dissemination. In 2017, this program was instrumental in the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse becoming the largest engagement event in recent U.S. history. Also, there are citizen science opportunities in data analysis, problem solving, and observations. Volunteers are excited to work with NASA become a part of the ecosystem of learners and STEM professionals—all the result of a science-activated global population!

BIOGRAPHY

Ms. Erickson manages NASA’s Science Activation program, citizen science, external IT, and strategic communications. She led record-breaking events: 2017 Total Solar Eclipse, 2012 Mars Curiosity Landing, and 2012 Transit of Venus. From 2006-09, she led NASA Strategic Communications as Deputy Associate Administrator (DAA), including NASA’s 50th and Apollo 40th anniversary celebrations. Previously, she managed the Space Shuttle Program Business Office (1994-1999) as Branch Chief, the Office of Biological and Physical Research Enterprise (2001-2003) as acting DAA (Management). Starting her career at the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas; she has college degrees from Texas A&M and Harvard.

 

Afternoon Session
B5.3 ThermCERT – A Signature Commercial Space Application to Tackle Fuel-Poverty in the United Kingdom

Steve Lee

CEO,
Stevenson Astrosat,
United Kingdom

Symposium: B5. IAF SYMPOSIUM ON INTEGRATED APPLICATIONS

Session: 3 – Satellite Commercial Applications

Room: 140B

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: ThermCERT – A Signature Commercial Space Application to Tackle Fuel-Poverty in the United Kingdom

 

ABSTRACT

In the UK, approximately 2.5 million households experienced fuel poverty during 2015. Suppliers of energy have been tasked with addressing this problem, finding households in need, and then employing measures to help these families save as much money as possible. Not only does this result in an improved economic situation and quality-of-life for the affected households, the energy companies can also maintain a competitive position in the marketplace.
A significant challenge, however, is to find the households that have the greatest needs. In partnership with the ESA and E.On, a leading energy provider in the UK, AstrosatUK has deployed the ThermCERT commercial satellite application product, which identifies and visualizes areas of the UK with the greatest levels of need. In this invited keynote talk, we present ThermCERT as one example of just how powerful the combination of existing space-based and terrestrial geospatial data can be, in order to solve critical human challenges through a commercial product.

BIOGRAPHY

Steve Lee, CEO of Stevenson Astrosat, is an award winning Astrophysicist and Astronautical Engineer. Proven innovator and Entrepreneur. A strong communicator and leader within the growing commercial space sector. His own commercial Astronautics and Earth observation company – Stevenson Astrosat is paving the way across the downstream using innovation to solve global challenges.

Its current focus is on Managed Earth Observation Services and solutions for disaster mitigation and resilience at government level as well as low carbon, core infrastructure and renewable energy solutions. As part of this Astrosat recently moved into hardware and payload development as well as integrated satellite communication systems.

D2.9-D6.2 Lasting Developments from Apollo and Saturn V

Roger Launius

Aerospace Historian,
Launius Historical Services,
United States

Symposium:  D2. IAF SPACE TRANSPORTATION SOLUTIONS AND INNOVATIONS SYMPOSIUM

Session: 9-D6.2 – The Apollo program and the rockets that took humanity to the moon

Room: 146C

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: Lasting Developments from Apollo and Saturn V

ABSTRACT

To accomplish the Moon landings in the 1960s and early 1970s NASA had to create the technology that could launch the astronauts, sustain them on a trip to and from the Moon, land them on the surface, and enable them to depart the Lunar Module and work on the Moon’s surface. The Saturn V rocket, the Command and Service Module, the Lunar Module, and the spacesuits that were built proved remarkably capable and usable, both for these missions, and provided a base of knowledge that has descended since that time. This presentation will explore this technology and its uses.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Roger D. Launius worked as a senior official at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., until retirement in 2017. Between 1990 and 2002 he served as chief historian of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He is the author, most recently, of The Smithsonian History of Space Exploration: From the Ancient World to the Extraterrestrial Future (Smithsonian Books, 2018); Apollo’s Legacy: The Space Race in Perspective (Smithsonian Books, 2019); and Reaching for the Moon: A Short History of Space Race (Yale University Press, 2019).

E3.6 The Economics of Procurement in Space & Defense Contracting

Eric Morel de Westgaver

Director of Industry, Procurement and Legal Services,
European Space Agency (ESA),
The Netherlands

Symposium:  E3. 32nd IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE POLICY, REGULATIONS AND ECONOMICS

Session: 6 – Economics of Procurement in Space Contracting

Room: 144A

Time: 13:30

 

KEYNOTE: The Economics of Procurement in Space & Defense Contracting

ABSTRACT

For the major future institutional missions, it is of vital importance for the public procurement authorities to have a solid and consolidated baseline prior to the initiation of the development phase.
Such solid baseline needs to be supported and validated through a detailed assessment of the requirements in relation to the available technologies.
The new space era should go hand in hand with a new acquisition policy involving a progressive transfer of responsibilities and design authority to industry.
This new distribution of responsibilities between the public sector and industry can become a reality as a result of different procurement policies such as joint proposal teams, joint dialogue phases and the concept of procurement as a service.
Transfer to industry of the responsibility for the mission related technology preparation activities is another example.
The economic impact of such approach could be substantial as it could lead to faster development times and earlier availability of the satellite functionalities/objectives.

BIOGRAPHY

Eric Morel de Westgaver is currently the Director of Industry, Procurement and Legal Services (D/IPL) of the European Space Agency (ESA) as well as the Head of ESA HQ Paris.

Since joining ESA in 1987, Mr. Morel de Westgaver has served in several functions at the agency, including as Head of the Procurement Department in the Directorate of Resources Management and Industrial Matters; as Director of Procurement, Financial Operations and Legal Affairs; and as Associate Director for Industrial Matters, to which he was nominated by the Director General.

He graduated in Economics from the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.